Brent and Harrow
5 May 2016 Vote for
Sadiq Khan Mayor of London
Navin Shah GLA Brent & Harrow
Labour Party Londonwide

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Navin's News for November 2012

I joined the “Hardest Hit” campaign on 30 November 2012

I joined a campaign on 3 December 2012 in support of the ‘Hardest Hit’ in Harrow. The demonstration organised by various voluntary sector organisations in Harrow started from Lowlands Road, Harrow and terminated outside the Harrow Council.

The demonstration marked the United Nations International Day of Persons with Disabilities’ was supported by Harrow leading organisations such as the Harrow Association of Disable People, Age UK – Harrow. Harrow Mind and Harrow Mencap. A large number of demonstrators demonstrated to protect services for disable people. I was joined by Gareth Thomas MP and a number of Harrow’s Councillors who showed their support to persons with disabilities, organisations and for equitable and sustainable development promoted for disable people by the United Nations.

I was pleased to join people of Harrow and a number of our local voluntary organisations to celebrate the United Nations day of persons with disabilities’ and participate with them to promote and protect the persons with disabilities. In the times of austerity measures persons with disabilities are hit even harder at all levels including deprivation and health care issues. I am taking a message to the London’s Mayor from the demonstration today and renew my fight to make Harrow on the Hill and Stanmore stations fully accessible.

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The new buses are accessible but fail to provide adequate space for wheelchair users. I pay tribute to the work of our voluntary organisations and the role they play in awareness of the issues and keeping the fight going.

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30th November 2012

Call to identify dangerous junctions and streets in Harrow and Brent

I am calling on local residents to identify dangerous junctions and streets in Brent and Harrow as part of Road Safety Week, coordinated by the charity Brake. The campaign GO 20 launched on Monday 19 November and I joined the campaign’s call to increase safety on local roads for people on foot and bicycle.

The GO 20 campaign is encouraging drivers to slow down to 20mph around homes, schools and shops. In 2009, a London Assembly Transport Committee investigation found that in areas where 20 mph has been introduced in London there has been a 42 per cent reduction in casualties.

Transport for London (TfL) has recently invited comments for a new Road Safety Action Plan for the capital. I backed the submission by the charity Living Streets, which focuses on road safety for pedestrians.

I fully support the GO 20 campaign to slow traffic down on our streets. A 20 mph limit offers the potential to increase levels of walking and cycling. I would like to hear from residents about where in Brent and Harrow could benefit from 20mph limits, where there are dangerous black spots and where crossings need to be made safer.

We also need to make sure that all dangerous junctions are identified and made safer for cyclists. I have campaigned about numerous dangerous junctions in Harrow and Brent including Stanmore Hill and The Broadway and Elmstead Avenue and Forty Lane. I’m calling on local residents to let me know which junctions they think are unsafe, they can write to me at navin.shah@london.gov.uk or write to Navin Shah AM, City Hall, London SE1 2AA.

At a time when the Mayor has cut the road safety budget from £59m in 2008 to just £23m this year, it is more important than ever to slow down traffic in residential areas and make all of our dangerous junctions and streets safe for people on foot and bicycle.

 

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19th November 2012

Merger of Harrow and Barnet Borough Commands Saved!

My colleague Andrew Dismore AM and I were informed by our respective Borough Commanders, independently about the Metropolitan Police / Mayor’s Office for Policing and Crime’s (MOPAC) plan to change the present arrangements, in which there will be one Borough Commander covering the two Boroughs of Harrow and Barnet.

When quizzed at the Mayor’s Question Time on 17 October, the Mayor in the first instance did not seem to know that there were any merger plans for Borough Command Units. But, when he was shown MOPAC’s own map for the merger he was ruffled. When further confronted about Harrow and Barnet, the Mayor seemed to be unsure. As a follow up Assembly Members Navin Shah and Andrew Dismore wrote jointly to the Mayor expressing their strong concerns about the merger of their Borough Commands. The letter to save the London Mayor’s proposal to merge the Borough Commands of Harrow and Barnet has drawn a surprising response from the Mayor of London amounting to backtracking of the merger proposals not just for Harrow and Barnet but also other Boroughs across London. However, the letter is guarded in that it leaves possibility for changes to the current arrangements.

It would appear that we’ve managed to save Harrow from losing its own Borough Commander but the Mayor’s reply to my letter is heavily guarded. The question is, if the Mayor and Deputy Mayor were so opposed to any merger plans, why didn’t MOPAC know about this and why did MOPAC continued consulting across London causing anxiety? I was told personally about the plans to merge by our own Borough Commander Dal Babu. Why didn’t senior police officers like the Borough Commanders in Harrow and Barnet didn’t know about this? Now the Mayor seems to be dismissing any plans for merger but I’m worried by his reference to any ‘compelling evidence’ emerging which could change his skepticism. Until the Mayor and his team give a decisive direction that there will be no mergers of Borough Commands concerns across London will remain. The London Mayor and MOPAC’s plans for the ‘new policing model’ are in a state of chaos and confusion. Merger of Borough Commands is a prime example of it.

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11th November 2012

Calls for English Defence League to be branded “extremist”

On 5 November, I sent a joint letter to the head of the Metropolitan Police with my colleagues Murad Qureshi, Jennette Arnold OBE and Dr Onkar Sahota to urge him to revise the Met’s view about the English Defence League (EDL) not being viewed as an extremist group. The Government banned the EDL from marching in Waltham Forest, Islington, Newham and Tower Hamlets for 30 days in late October.

The Met applied to the Secretary of State Theresa May amid fears of public disorder as the EDL prepared to march in Walthamstow for the second time in one month. Members of the EDL have targeted London boroughs where there are a number of different faiths.

I called on Police Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe to brand the EDL as an extremist group. Members of the EDL are disrupting our communities and promoting violence and racist ideology. They are obviously a far-right group, bent on causing as much trouble in our diverse communities as possible.

I think it is disgraceful that people such as the EDL who don’t even live in London and have to travel from outside the city are allowed to come to our neighbourhood to promote their evil racist ideology. We must stand together and recognise the EDL for what they are, an extremist far-right group.

The Met applied to the Secretary of State Theresa May amid fears of public disorder as the EDL prepared to march in Walthamstow for the second time in one month. Members of the EDL have targeted London boroughs where there are a number of different faiths.

I called on Police Commissioner Bernard Hogan-Howe to brand the EDL as an extremist group. Members of the EDL are disrupting our communities and promoting violence and racist ideology. They are obviously a far-right group, bent on causing as much trouble in our diverse communities as possible.

I think it is disgraceful that people such as the EDL who don’t even live in London and have to travel from outside the city are allowed to come to our neighbourhood to promote their evil racist ideology. We must stand together and recognise the EDL for what they are, an extremist far-right group.

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5th November 2012

The fight goes on to keep Fire Stations open

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I led a group of London Labour MPs and Assembly Member colleagues to hand-deliver a letter to Mayor Boris Johnson at City Hall on 1 November. The letter, signed by 33 London MPs, calls on the Mayor to re-think his proposed drastic cuts to the London Fire Brigade which could see 17 fire stations, 17 fire appliances and over 600 firefighters lost across London, including Willesden Green Fire Station in Brent.

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Conservative Chair of the Fire Authority, James Cleverly, has publicly stated that only 28 out of London’s 112 stations “will definitely not close”. There has been no public consultation on this issue which threatens to put Londoners’ safety at risk.

The London Fire Brigade is facing severe cuts due to the government slashing the fire budget by 25%. This represents the biggest shake-up to the London Fire Brigade since it was created 146 years ago.

The budget was cut by £29.5million this year and will be slashed by a further £35.3million next year, a total of £65million. These losses are even deeper than the 20% cut to the police budget.

We called on the Mayor to re-think these dangerous cuts which will put the safety of Londoners at risk. It is about time he listened to residents across the city and abandoned these plans. Londoners including people in my constituency of Brent and Harrow are deeply concerned and worried about losing their local fire station.

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I understand that savings have to be made, but the level of cuts forced on the London Fire Brigade by the Mayor and government are truly reckless. They are cutting too far, too fast. They are hitting front-line services and putting public safety at risk. The Mayor needs to listen to the concerns of Londoners and change course.

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2nd November 2012