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Navin's News for November 2010

Only 4 Stations in Harrow are accessible

New figures reveal that 71 per cent of Harrow’s stations cannot be used by people with restricted mobility

One in ten Londoners are excluded from large parts of the transport network because of mobility issues, according to a report by the London Assembly. The report found that in Harrow only 4 tube and rail stations out of 14 have step-free access.

There are 26,620 residents who live in the borough with reduced mobility. Stanmore and Harrow-on-the-Hill are two key stations in the borough that have been identified by local interest groups to have a severe lack of accessibility.

Local London Assembly member, Navin Shah, has called on Mayor Boris Johnson to get a grip of the situation. Last year the Mayor deferred the plans of his predecessor to make 22 stations step-free. Navin said: "Parents with buggies or prams, elderly people and those with disabilities are frozen out of so much of our transport network. Boris Johnson needs to get a grip of this and show that he is a Mayor for all Londoners.

“This affects a high number of residents in Harrow and little progress has been made. The refurbishment of Harrow-on-the-Hill will regenerate the area and make it a fully integrated transport hub. Stanmore is another station where lack of accessibility is just not good enough.” 

The full report, supporting maps and evidence can be found here. You can sign the petition here.

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26th November 2010

Only 6 stations in Brent are accessible

New figures reveal that 78 per cent of Brent’s stations cannot be used by people with restricted mobility.

One in ten Londoners are excluded from large parts of the transport network because of mobility issues, according to a report by the London Assembly. In Brent only 6 tube and rail stations out of 27 have step-free access. There are 33,225 residents who live in the borough with reduced mobility, yet only 43% of Brent’s bus stops are fully accessible.

Local London Assembly member, Navin Shah, has called on Mayor Boris Johnson to get a grip of the situation. Last year the Mayor deferred the plans of his predecessor to make 22 stations step-free. Navin said: "Parents with buggies or prams, elderly people and those with disabilities are frozen out of so much of our transport network. Boris Johnson needs to get a grip of this and show that he is a Mayor for all Londoners.

“This affects a high number of residents in Brent, yet little progress has been made. Lack of accessibility is just not good enough, especially when people from around the world come to Wembley to visit the stadium.” 

The full report, supporting maps and evidence can be found here.

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26th November 2010

Brent's Police teams under threat

London Mayor Boris Johnson gives green light to Brent police to change make up of safer neighbourhood teams.

Every ward in London is currently covered by a fixed model of one police sergeant, two constables and three community support officers. But Boris Johnson says this could be about to change. Supposedly ‘safer wards’ should have ‘flexibility’ to change the teams, the Mayor said this week.

If the ‘flexible’ working approach was deployed it would be critical to ensure that the so-called ‘safe’ wards do not end up being neglected areas and crime hotspots, wiping out all the good work carried out over the past years and endangering strong partnerships with local communities.

He said it was up to local police to decide whether they need the teams. "It would be crazy for me to order them to have a one size fits all approach", he told London Assembly members.

Local Labour Assembly member, Navin Shah, said: “Brent is already affected by the reduction in police numbers due to the freeze on recruitment. Neighbourhood policing in London has been a great success, and the model has worked well. It's worrying that the model which has served Brent for the last five years now appears to be under threat at the same time the number of officers on the beat is going to go down.”

At this month's mayor's question time on 17 November Boris Johnson said: "I don't want to be absolutely rigid about this. I'm not saying every ward has to have an identical configuration of sergeants, constables and PCSOs." He went on, "I'm not anticipating what the shape of the force is going to be after we've been through this process …. These are operational matters. I think that borough commanders will want to have some flexibility in deciding how their resources are to be distributed across their wards. Some wards will clearly be safer than others... I think there's a case for them to be give some margin for manoeuvre."

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23rd November 2010

Harrow police to change make up of safer neighbourhood teams

London Mayor Boris Johnson gives green light to Harrow police to change make up of safer neighbourhood teams.

Every ward in London is currently covered by a fixed model of one police sergeant, two constables and three community support officers. But Boris Johnson says this could be about to change. Supposedly ‘safer wards’ should have ‘flexibility’ to change the teams, the Mayor said this week.

If the ‘flexible’ working approach was deployed it would be critical to ensure that the so-called ‘safe’ wards do not end up being neglected areas and crime hotspots, wiping out all the good work carried out over the past years and endangering strong partnerships with local communities.

He said it was up to local police to decide whether they need the teams. "It would be crazy for me to order them to have a one size fits all approach", he told London Assembly members.

Local Labour Assembly member, Navin Shah, said: “Harrow is already affected by the reduction in police numbers due to the freeze on recruitment. Neighbourhood policing in London has been a great success, and the model has worked well. It's worrying that the model which has served Brent for the last five years now appears to be under threat at the same time the number of officers on the beat is going to go down.”

At this month's mayor's question time on 17 November Boris Johnson said: "I don't want to be absolutely rigid about this. I'm not saying every ward has to have an identical configuration of sergeants, constables and PCSOs." He went on, "I'm not anticipating what the shape of the force is going to be after we've been through this process …. These are operational matters. I think that borough commanders will want to have some flexibility in deciding how their resources are to be distributed across their wards. Some wards will clearly be safer than others... I think there's a case for them to be give some margin for manoeuvre."

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23rd November 2010

ColArt 'welcomes' council efforts to find Harrow home after Winsor and Newton factory closes

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By Jack Royston

AN art company due to close its Wealdstone factory has “welcomed” efforts by Harrow Council to find a home in the borough for its headquarters.

Colart will make 190 people redundant when it shuts Winsor and Newton, in Whitefriars Avenue, but says it will base its headquarters, museum and research and development facilities in Britain.

The council is hoping to keep the company in the borough, preventing 80 jobs from going elsewhere, and there is a possibility artist studios and a gallery will be set up.

Neil Robson, managing director of ColArt, said: “We welcome the continued support of Harrow Council to find a suitable location for our head office group and look forward to continued discussions with them on this.”

Councillor Bill Stephenson, leader of the council, said: “While we are disappointed that Colart has decided to move its manufacturing operations, the company is retaining up to 80 staff in its headquarters and we believe there is an excellent case for those jobs to stay in Harrow.

“We are offering the company all the help available to find new premises in the borough, and we will, of course, continue to support those staff facing redundancy.”

The factory, which has been open since 1937, supplies Prince Charles' household and Winsor and Newton was given a royal warrant by Queen Victoria in 1841.

But the site will close by the end of 2011, with phased reductions in staff starting in January.

ColArt says Wealdstone is too residential an area to allow it to expand its operation and is therefore moving manufacturing to Le Mans, in France.

Cllr Stephenson, Councillor Phil O'Dell, Navin Shah, London Assembly member for Brent and Harrow, and Mark Billington, head of the council's economic unit, met the company on Thursday.

AND

Navin Shah says:

I had previously met with trade union representatives at ColArt to discuss the future of the business and the job security of their members. Whilst disappointed that ColArt has decided to move production to France, I am pleased to see that the staff currently working in the headquarters will not be losing their jobs.

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22nd November 2010

Mayor appears to commit to protecting London's fire services

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By Tristan Kirk

THE Mayor of London appears to have quashed the idea of cutting the number of fire engines in the capital.

London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority last week agreed to investigate the possibility of cutting 27 appliances from the brigade in the wake of October's industrial action.

But Boris Johnson, when quizzed on the matter, said: “I have talked to the chairman [of the authority] about this matter and I'm assured there are no plans for a reduction in frontline services.”

When pressed by Navin Shah, assembly member for Brent and Harrow, Mr Johnson added: “I'm in favour of retaining the 27 fire appliances. I'm not going to get into some pointless argument with you when we are entirely in agreement that there shouldn't be a reduction of fire appliances.”

When the idea was suggested by the fire authority, chairman by Brian Coleman, it caused uproar among the Fire Brigade Union.

Mr Coleman suggested that the strike by the capital's firefighters had shown the brigade could cope with less resources, and the authority was obliged to investigate making cuts.

When the strike was called, 27 engines were used to provide fire cover.

Matt Wrack, general secretary of the union, said 27 engines have now been taken out of service and accused Mr Coleman of acting spitefully.

He said: “I have an idea that Brian Coleman thinks he’s somehow punishing firefighters for their two recent one-day strikes, by confiscating 27 of their fire engines.

“It’s a childish way of behaving, and the Mayor should have told Mr Coleman to grow up and return London’s fire engines, not providing cover for him.

“What Mr Coleman wants to do is slash the fire service in London, and the Mayor covered up for him this morning. Neither of them know the first thing about the risks of firefighting.”

This is the latest twist in a rumbling dispute between the fire union and brigade management, who started talks on Tuesday to try to resolve the problems, about changes to shift patterns.

Ron Dobson, Brigade Commissioner, said: “I hope that the recommendations from the meeting will help us bring an end to the current dispute.

“Although the meeting won’t result in an immediate agreement, I do expect recommendations to come back to both ourselves and the Union within a week or so.

“I hope we can then finally agree start and finish times that will help us make Londoners and firefighters safer.”

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18th November 2010

NHS Harrow blasted by Navin Shah over fire at Kenmore clinic

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By Jack Royston

A LABOUR politician has blasted NHS Harrow after a fire at a derelict Kenton health centre where there is asbestos.

The organisation closed down Kenmore Clinic because of health and safety fears in December 2008 but the building has sat, overgrown with weeds, for almost two years.

At around 6pm last night a fire started, damaging the roof and part of the one storey building, in Kenmore Road, sending smoke billowing into the skies above.

Navin Shah, London Assembly Member for Brent and Harrow, says he met chief executive Mark Easton in September highlighting concerns about vandalism and the safety of the site, but claims his calls fell on deaf ears.

Mr Shah, who is also a member of the fire authority, is now calling for an investigation into the safety of the building and even called for Harrow Council inspectors to be called in.

He said: “We have constantly asked about the future of this site particularly concerns about the clinic, which was shut down without consultation, and the chief executive has done nothing.”

The grounds are protected only by a relatively low fence and Mr Shah, who is also a ward councillor for the area, says he is concerned children may even break inside the building.

Following a review of health and safety at the clinic in 2008 a damning report exposed a raft of problems, including with the maintenance of the safety of asbestos and with the security of the fence, windows and doors.

The documented recommended the clinic be closed “immediately” without consultation, due to the “urgency and severity” of problems with the “unacceptable” building.

Robert Smith, a spokesman for NHS Harrow, confirmed the organisation still owns the site, which is insured, and said there was no asbestos in the roof, where the most visible damage was done.

He said: “NHS Harrow understands that the London Fire Brigade is currently investigating the cause of the fire.

“We are eager to know what happened and will be able to comment further at that stage.”

 

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Comment from Navin:

This picture was taken before the fire at Kenmore Clinic, when I and fellow councillors initially asked NHS Harrow to secure the grounds properly.

kenmore 2.jpg

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17th November 2010

Brian Coleman to be questioned over freebie dinners with strike-breaking firm

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By Ross Lydall

Fun and games are expected at Thursday's meeting of the London fire authority.

First, a delegation of women firefighters will protest outside the 2pm meeting to demand the reinstatement of Sian Griffiths, who has been suspended on an alleged charge of bullying a strike-breaking woman colleague.

Ms Griffiths, 50, right, described by the brigade as a "trailblazer", was escorted off the premises just two days after receiving the Queen's Fire Service Medal at Buckingham Palace. She has received more than 600 messages of support since I broke the story last week.

The meeting itself could prove awkward for the authority's Tory chairman, Brian Coleman. Darren Johnson, a Green member of the London Assembly, is demanding an investigation into two notorious incidents of firefighters being injured on the picket line during the two recent FBU walk-outs.

(i) Question 257 from Councillor Darren Johnson AM (Green Party):
Will the Chairman request the Commissioner undertakes a formal investigation, including an independent element, of the following reported incidents during industrial action on 1 November: 1 of 3
a) firefighter hit by a car at Croydon Fire Station, and withholding of first aid equipment; b) FBU London representative and firefighter hit by fire engines at Southwark Fire Station
And will the Chairman ensure that the findings of such an investigation are published?

UPDATE Nov 19: At yesterday's meeting Mr Coleman answered: "No." Darren Johnson accused him of "pouring oil on the flames" of the unresolved fire dispute by suggesting axeing 27 engines, describing the proposal as "just plain barking mad". He told Mr Coleman: "You have become so addicted to conflict it's become your way of life... it's become a drug for you."

In addition, Labour's Navin Shah is asking a potentially embarrassing question about the (declared) hospitality received by Mr Coleman from Asset Co, the private firm that won a £12 million deal to provide emergency fire cover and whose contractors stood in for striking firefighters.

The dinners, at Shepherd's restaurant in Westminster, a favourite hang-out of MPs, were all from Asset Co chief exec John Shannon (left). In January this year the pair changed venues - opting instead for Green's restaurant in Duke Street, Mayfair.

It could of course be argued that it made sense for the pair to meet regularly in advance of signing a contract using such vast sums of public money. What's more, the sums are modest - more than can be said of the bill racked up by former FBU general secretary Andy Gilchrist at the Cinnamon Club. I also expect Mr Coleman, right, to have worked out with lawyers in advance how to rule the question out of order. Here's Navin's question:

Councillor Navin Shah AM (Leader, Labour Group):
The recent press coverage concerning the hospitality outlined below which was received by you from Asset Co prior to the award of a contract:
· Lunch to a value of £25 on 30 October 2007
· Dinner to a value of £50 on 23 July 2008
· A Harvey Nichols hamper to a value of £350 on 24 December 2008
· Dinner to a value of £40 on 19 January 2009
has been highly critical. Do you now accept that these actions reflect poor judgement and a lack of sensitivity on your part and will you now assure Londoners that such damaging conduct will not be repeated in the future?

UPDATE Nov 19: Mr Coleman replied: "I would have thought that the Member would have used the Chairman's Questions opportunity to raise important issues of Authority policy." He added: "My entirely proper relationship with AssetCo will continue."

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16th November 2010

New Shift Changes For Firefighters: Navin Shah AM welcomes an end to the dispute

Today’s meeting of the London Fire & Emergency Planning Authority saw London saved from further strike action by London’s firefighters.  At a specially-convened meeting of the Authority, new shift patterns for London’s firefighters were agreed subject to endorsement by the FBU’s London Regional Committee meeting tomorrow.

Speaking after the meeting, Labour's Leader on the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority, Navin Shah said:

“This is the best news Londoners have had against all expectations and I welcome the commitment of the FBU in signing up to the shift changes.”

“Our tabled Amendment, supported by all the opposition groups, to bring a further report on the negotiations as planned to the Authority meeting on 27 January would have allowed our Commissioner, Ron Dobson, to negotiate a collective settlement at the earliest opportunity.  It is scandalous that the Amendment was voted down purely for party political reasons by the Conservatives.  Throughout the industrial dispute Brian Coleman’s conduct has been disgraceful but I hope the Authority will recover from the damage he has caused to its reputation. ”

“The Labour Group has said all along that a negotiated settlement is the only way forward and I am delighted we now have reached a scenario where the threat of imposing new contracts on our firefighters by confrontational Chairman Brian Coleman and his Conservative Group has been lifted. I very much hope that the union’s London Regional Committee agrees this at its meeting tomorrow and Londoners can look forward to getting back their missing 27 fire engines without further delay.”  

 

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13th November 2010

Shah hits out at fire engine cuts plan

In The HA1

The London Assembly member for Harrow and Brent has hit out at a plan to look at reducing the number of fire engines serving the capital.

Navin Shah said London Fire Authority (LFA) Chair Brian Coleman had gone back on his word over the possibility of cuts to the service.

Mr Coleman said the LFA should look into reducing the number of fire engines to help save money, after just 27 were used to cover the recent strike action.

He also cited a ban on overtime as a sign that changes could be made, saying: “We are really grateful to the FBU for showing us that there are possible efficiencies.

“The union has banned overtime for two to three months and London doesn’t seem to have come to a halt.”

Mr Shah, who is the Labour leader on the London Fire Emergency Planning Authority, said the decision was poorly timed and reneged on previous commitments.

He said: “Councillor Coleman gave a public assurance last week that he would not be cutting fire engines, firefighters or fire stations.

“At this sensitive time when we are trying to settle the dispute, Coleman can’t even wait until the ink is dry before he’s talking about more cuts.”

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10th November 2010

Labour rival calls for Mayor Boris Johnson to sack Barnet's Brian Coleman as head of the London Fire Authority

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By Alex Hayes

THE leading Labour representative on the London Fire Authority has called on Boris Johnson to “reconsider” Brian Coleman's position as chairman.

Navin Shah, the Brent and Harrow London Assembly member, welcomed firefighters calling off today's planned 47-hour walkout after a dispute about hours.

The Fire Brigade Union and LFA will now sit down for talks later this month, with hopes of a resolution to the problem.

Mr Shah said: ““Mayor Boris Johnson and his confrontational and aggressive fire authority Chairman have massively hindered the negotiation process.

“The Mayor should take control of this situation and re-consider Brian Coleman’s position.

“The longer he is in place the less likely it is an agreement will be reached to bring this dispute to an end.”

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5th November 2010

Firefighters call off Bonfire Night and Diwali strikes

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By James Cracknell

HARROW and Brent have been spared a potentially dangerous clash of Diwali, Bonfire Night and a strike by firefighters as union bosses called off the industrial action over fears for public safety.

The Fire Brigade's Union (FBU) and the LFB have now agreed to sit down to try and resolve their differences at an independently chaired meeting on November 16.

Union leader Matt Wrack said the strike was called off amid growing concerns over private contractor AssetCo's ability to cope and fears for public safety,

He said: "We have listened to the concerns about public safety and we have watched the work of the private contractors who are supposed to protect Londoners with mounting concern."

London fire commissioner Ron Dobson said: "My intention has always been to reach an agreement on proposals that will make Londoners safer and firefighters safer.

"Going to an independently-chaired body to help us seek a way forward is a step in the right direction."

LFB issued a notice to 5,500 London fireifighters in August explaining that their existing contracts would be terminated in November, with new shift patterns and working conditions issued instead.

The brigade had earlier won a High Court injunction placing restrictions on FBU picket lines, to allow stand-in crews from AssetCo to access fire stations unobstructed.

Reacting on Friday (5), Labour’s leader on the London Fire Emergency Planning Authority (LFEPA) said he welcomed the FBU’s decision.

Kenton East councillor Navin Shah, also London Assembly member for Harrow and Brent, said: “This is excellent news.

"I very much welcome the positive and responsible approach by the FBU in agreeing to the mediation meeting on 16 November.

"I have been urging all parties to get round the table and talk as nothing short of a negotiated settlement will do.”

Mr Shah had ealrier slammed fire brigade bosses for their treatment of firefighters.

“Mayor Boris Johnson and his confrontational and aggressive fire authority chairman have massively hindered the negotiation process.

"The mayor should take control of this situation and reconsider Brian Coleman’s position.

"The longer he is in place the less likely it is an agreement will be reached to bring this dispute to an end.”

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5th November 2010

Brent Cross Cricklewood : £4.5 billion regen project signed off

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By Glenn McMahon

 

A £4.5 billion regeneration project was given the go-ahead after a council agreed the finer details to an additional £1 billion worth of investment by the developer.

Barnet Council’s approval comes after a decade of meetings, reports and negotiations that have raised fierce opposition across several north London boroughs to aspects of the Brent Cross Cricklewood development.

The Coalition for a Sustainable BCC Plan (CSBCCP) have continually criticised elements of the plans including: a waste handling facility or incinerator, that will burn waste next to a Brent primary school; pollution, caused by an additional 29,000 car journeys made to the area and the negative impact on local businesses.

The developer, which disputes the Coalition’s findings, says the project will create thousands of jobs and homes in an area in desperate need of investment.

Lia Colacicco, co-ordinator of the CSBCCP, said: “This controversial scheme is based on last century assumptions about housing, transport and mega shopping centres. With capacity for additional retail space in London already under intense scrutiny, why double the Brent Cross shopping centre causing further devastation of local high streets across north and west London.”

While outline permission has been agreed, each building must still go before planning committees for approval where opposition groups say they will fight them individually.

Ms Colacicco said: “This is a sad day for local democracy, but people still have the chance to fight this development building by building - starting with the incinerator.”

The additional investment secured by Barnet Council, called S106 agreements, includes £515.5 for new transport infrastructure and the Waste Handling facility.

The Coalition says the money will encourage more car usage and the opportunity to build a light railway system that would improve links across north London and help reduce pollution and traffic has been missed.

Navin Shah, Labour party Assembly Member for Brent and Harrow, said: “The planning process has been a complete shambles from start to finish. Every single authority responsible for the assessment of the planning application has abjectly failed.

“My constituents are now left facing the prospect of hugely increased traffic and congestion, and an incinerator with a 140m high chimney, equivalent to a 50-storey tower block on their doorsteps.”

A further £189 million will be spent on ‘environmental measures’, £112m on ground clean-up and waste disposal, £109m on community and social infrastructure and £38.5m on public open and green space.

Jonathan Joseph, spokesman for the Brent Cross Cricklewood Development Partners, said: “Now that we have secured planning approval we can start to address key conditions of the Section 106 Agreement in addition to other detailed work necessary to facilitate a start on site in around four years time. A vital part of our work moving forward will be engagement with local people and the wider community to ensure that everyone is fully involved with and informed of our plans.”

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1st November 2010

Striking firefighters in Hendon and Finchley welcome support during eight hour walk out

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By Kevin Bradford

FIREFIGHTERS at picket lines today welcomed the public's support towards their strike and urged Brigade bosses to hold further talks in a bid to avert future action.

Crews across the borough stood outside their fire stations in a show of solidarity against the London Fire Brigade's (LFB) plans to change shift patterns under the threat of redundancies.

Dozens of staff turned out this morning at each station for a peaceful protest after 11th hour talks between the LFB and the union collapsed.

Steve Renny, Fire Brigade Union (FBU) representative for Finchley station, said: “We are all disappointed we didn't reach an agreement yesterday.

“We don't want to be out on strike today or on November 5, but if that is what it takes to hold on to our jobs.

“We are hoping the public will be behind us and realise this isn't about money, it is purely about our start and finish times and getting a good time for our members and their families.

“We will talk to them but without the threat of the sack. Remove that, and we would call off the strikes immediately.”

Fire brigade union bosses said yesterday the London Fire Brigade (LFB) “point blank refused” to lift the threat to sack 5,500 firefighters.

Crews from Hendon Fire Station set up a stool outside their station in The Burroughs, and were receiving beeps and waves of support from passers by.

Shaun Powell, the station's union representative, said: “The response from the public has been very good. People have been supportive of us.

“We are always disappointed we have to strike. If it was avoidable then we would do it. We are all prepared to change, but we don't want change for change sake.

“We all accept changes to shift patterns are going to happen, but that negotiation should not be done with a gun to our heads.”

Cover throughout the day was provided by private firm AssetCo, and crews were located at Tottenham and Wembley to respond to 999 calls in the north London area.

But Mr Renny said if AssetCo staff had been drafted into his station, there would have been no displays of aggression.

He said: “If they had come here, we would have let them know what they're doing and politely asked them not to cross the picket line.

“We just wanted to explain that our jobs are at risk.”

A statement from the LFB confirmed the contingency plans were rolled out this morning and that all 162 contract staff providing fire and rescue service across London were available or waiting to be deployed by 11am, an hour after the strike started.

A total of 27 fully crewed appliances were operating and responding to 999 calls across the city until 6pm when the strike ends.

Navin Shah AM, Labour Leader on the London Fire and Emergency Planning Authority, today urged the union to re-think their strike, planned for bonfire night, and called for Mayor of London, Boris Johnson, to replace the authority's chair, Barnet Councillor Brian Coleman.

Mr Shah said: “The confrontational, unnecessarily aggressive approach of Brian Coleman has been matched by the absence of Boris Johnson. It’s been a complete shambles. Relations with the union should never have reached this dire state.

“The best way to diffuse the current situation would be for the Mayor to install new leadership at the Fire Authority and engage with the FBU.”

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1st November 2010

Stanmore Steps: ASPIRE challenge the Mayor with costed lift plans

In 2010, the charity ASPIRE, whose National Training Centre is based on Wood Lane, Stanmore, carried out an analysis of their own for the estimated costs of installing a lift, truly step-free access, at Stanmore London Underground Station. I was delighted to put these costings to the Mayor at November's Question Time.

I was contacted recently by ASPIRE, a national charity that supports people with spinal cord injury (SCI), based in Stanmore. They asked a private contractor to look into a feasible and affordable plan to make Stanmore station accessible, because of the proximity of the station to the Royal National Orthopaedic Hospital and the Aspire National Training Centre. Currently, Stanmore station is not accessible for wheelchair users to access independently. What are TfL’s plans to make the station accessible for wheelchair users and would you consider ASPIRE’s proposals to install a lift at an approximate cost of £10,000 plus VAT with a £400 a year maintenance contract that would benefit thousands of disabled Londoners every year?

Answer by Boris Johnson

Previous experience suggests that private contractors can sometimes underestimate the costs of working on the Tube network, however I would be happy to pass on ASPIRE’s plans to London Underground (LU) if they were to send them to me.

It should be noted that there is already a step-free route to and from the platforms at Stanmore using a ramp (which has been independently assessed as complying fully with British Standards) via the car park. However, LU is aware that some customers may find this route difficult to use, particularly independent wheelchair users.

LU provides detailed information about the access at Stanmore via its Step-Free Tube Guide and at www.directenquiries.com to allow those who require step-free access to make an informed decision about whether they will be able to manage the route.

 

Transport for London have never provided an estimated cost of these works. We hope to have a more detailed response to these proposals soon.

 

If you have any comments about, or would like to share your experience of, disabled access at Stanmore, why not contact me?

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1st November 2010